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Teaching Artist Roster

Get to know our amazing, professional teaching artists!

Tyler Read

Artistic Medium:
Graffiti

Connections Between Art and Classroom:
I have worked in several classrooms and grades now and have found ways to adapt to most subjects. As a graffiti artist my strong suits are line, shape, and movement. I have done lessonson composition, shape, and symmetry by creating Northwest Native "Totem" art of the Salish, Haida, and Tlingit tribes for a classroom history lesson on the Lewis and Clarke expedition.For a class learning about ecosystems, we turned wind currents into graffiti art lettering with an emphasis on movement and flow.

Education and Experience:
Although I have attended two arts colleges (Cornish College of the Arts, Seattle, WA. and Kendall College of Art and Design, Grand Rapids, MI.) I learned about the craft and culture of graffiti art in the most authentic way possible: in the streets. When I moved to Rapid City and discovered Art Alley, I learned how to take that craft, and turn it into something positive and beneficial to the community I lived in. I began by mentoring youth who were painting in that space. Then I started connecting with different organizations, collaborating on projects and commissions, teaching classes, and doing live demonstrations. I have had the opportunity to paint alongside, and learn from, some of graffiti art’s forefathers: Artists such as Chicago's "Fess," "East" from Denver, Daesk" and "Biafra" from Minneapolis, and "Desi" from the Community Rejuvenation Project in Oakland, most of whom are featured in books on the history of graffiti art. I have been employed by the Rapid City Arts Council for nearly 3 years now as their Arts Education Outreach Coordinator, specializing in teen, young adult, and at-risk youth programing. I have been in 14 art exhibits, including "Where The Wild Things Are" at the Dahl Arts Center which I both curated and participated in, and a recent solo exhibit titled "State of Flux" at University Center in Rapid City. I also do consulting with communities that want to start their own public art spaces, and helped create Waniyetu Wowapi Art Park on the Cheyenne River Reservation.

More About The Artist:
I grew up in Seattle, WA, and spent nearly a decade working in automotive factories in Michigan before settling down here in Rapid City. Growing up in Seattle, I was surrounded by graffiti, but it remained a vague curiosity until 7th grade when I came across an article in the Seattle Post about the secret life of graffiti artists. The story and images sparked something in me, and I remember thinking to myself, "this is it. I've found what is meant for me." Twenty-five years later, I can say that my thoughts way back then were correct. It has given my life purpose and direction, that and my wife and two girls. I have worked with people ranging in age from 3rd grade to adult to offer a variety of creative programs and experiences.

The thing that is most important for me to share is passion and enthusiasm for a person’s creativity. I believe that a lot of people don't feel like they have the right to their own creativity because they lack skill and execution, which the heart of creativity is neither of those things. Creativity is what makes us human. Skill is simply the passion to master it, but we all have the right to creativity/humanity.

Sue Sasso

Artistic Medium:
oil painting/ some watercolor

Connections Between Art and Classroom:
Art is all around us.  Principles and elements of art are part of our everyday life.  Buildings, automobiles, roads, furniture, silverware and clothing are examples where artistic ideas are employed to make objects both usable and beautiful.  Art from the masters is a reference for history, science, culture and politics; it is a record of what has shaped human existence from the beginning of time. Cave artists use the same pigments we use today – ochre and charcoal. Thomas Eakins’, “The Gross Clinic,” depicts medical science and education in 1875.  Goya’s “The 3rd of May, 1808” is a political painting depicting the horrors of war and revolution.  We know what people in ancient civilizations did for entertainment because of the art they left behind.  We cannot study art without understanding the social ideas, culture, and history of the time.  In short, art cannot be studied or taught in a vacuum.  Art influences and is influenced by every aspect of life.  To teach art, artists must also teach history, science, language, and math. Luca Pacioli, author of the 16th century book, On The Divine Proportion, wrote, “Without mathematics there is no art.”  The same can be said for all other educational disciplines.

Education and Experience:
I attended County College of Morris, Randolph, NJ, and received an Associate of Art in Fine Art, and also received my Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Science from South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. I have studied my craft through reading, practicing, and experimenting with new techniques and ideas.  I will continue to study art since one should never stop learning and growing.  I also find teaching a very effective tool for learning and developing my art form.   I have participated in several local plein air events and have recently won two People’s Choice awards: one at the 2014 Silver City Plein Air Paint Out and the other at the 2014 Urban Plein Air in Rapid City. 

More About The Artist:
I grew up in New Jersey and moved to Rapid City in 1992. I have enjoyed art for as long as I can remember. I have studied art in college and throughout my life using books, videos, taking classes and studying the Old Masters.  I have 3 children, 2 whom I homeschool.  My oldest son was homeschooled through high school and is now attending college. I have taught various art and science classes at my homeschool co-op. I have volunteered at the YMCA in the drop-in nursery and at my church in the preschool and elementary programs. I am also taking cello lessons, so I l know a little about music as well.  We are a creative family that values the arts, education and civic responsibility. 

I am excited to encourage and inspire students to be creative while teaching them about art.  I also hope the students learn that art is all around us and not just for decoration - it is an integral part of our existence. 

Beth-Anne Ferley

Artistic Medium:
Reusable Items

Connections Between Art and Classroom:
Creating fun and unique items such as musical instruments, display animals, and sculptures from items that   would normally be thrown away relate to science, math, and social studies. We can discuss the three R’s Reduce – Reuse – Recycle and how it relates to what is being taught in the classroom. For example, a science lesson where natural resources is the topic could include creating something from plastic, as plastic is made from oil.

Education and Experience:
I have consistently tried to find ways to use what we already have on hand to show how we can do a small part is preserving the earth. I am self taught with art, I researched and practiced creative sandblasting on glass, while doing this I had the opportunity to work with Dale Lamphere on many of his projects. I partner with many of the high school art departments for “Scare in the Square” project made completely from recycled materials. My professional career consists of a Bachelor of Science in Marketing and an MBA. My husband and I opened our own engraving store where much of where my creativity began. I enjoy working with students, giving them items they would never think to use in art and begin to create something unique to them and relating it to the three R’s.

More About the Artist:
I am a transplant to Rapid City SD. I grew up in Pittsburgh PA, met my husband (who is from Philip, SD) in Indiana. When our daughter would begin kindergarten we decided to move closer to his parents and open our own engraving business. This is where interest in art grew. I have always worked and volunteered in areas where I teach children. Currently, I am the Recycling Education Coordinator for the City of Rapid City.

I would like children to experience fun and creativity that comes from taking items that you would throw away and use it to create something.

Anastasia Smith

Artistic Medium:
painting, sculpture, scenic art

Connections Between Art and Classroom:
I have used art to help me learn and remember nearly every subject. Drawing used as a memory device helps me to recall formulae in math and science class. Drawing and coloring are a great way to explore the natural world. From an understanding of bodies to botany to recording and sharing what is seen under a microscope, art is an important part of the scientific process. Fantasy and imagination can come into play when we put seemingly unrelated images together to see how things might work. Developing and maintaining a childlike sense of wonder as you learn requires that the creative and intuitive parts of the brain are engaged. Art is as much about maintaining joy in learning as it is about imagery. Sculpture and crafts are a great way to understand and remember things like how muscles work, or how a sentence structure can be strong or weak. Art is at the intersection of geometry and construction. A bridge will not stand without structural shapes and those shapes create beauty. Exploring this intersection makes all three subjects more interesting and easier to remember.

Education and Experience:
I earned a Bachelor’s Degree in fine arts from the University of South Dakota in 1996. After that I worked for nearly 20 years as a stage tech and scenic artist in Las Vegas. During that time I continued my own work as a painter, took a few sculpture classes at the college of southern Nevada, and began training horses and dogs. My skill at depicting animals improved a lot during this time. I also did a lot of work with faux finishes, gold leaf and bronzing powder, and became an expert in color mixing. In 2014, I returned to my hometown of Rapid City to focus on my artwork.

More About the Artist:
I was born in Rapid City and have recently returned. For several years I have been teaching children's art classes through an equestrian therapy program in Las Vegas. I currently teach a Young Rembrandts elementary drawing program at Grand View Elementary. I began drawing as a child so I could see what my fantasies would look like. I love giving form and life to things that did not exist. Oil paints quickly followed drawing. Both were self-taught until a few classes in high school. I took the equivalent of a minor in art during my time at the University of South Dakota and have not stopped practicing, exploring, and learning since. I love sculpture and oil painting and have explored nearly every other medium I could get my hands on. I enjoy the challenges of teaching, communicating, and training whether I am working with children, adults, or animals. I want to find that sense of wonder that art brings out and make sure it stays connected with the learning process!

 

 

 

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