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ON THE BLOG:

Artist's Reflections on Summer 2016

March 2017
By Masayuki Nagase

Last summer I started to work on the first 36-foot-tall vertical spire in the Black Hills Stone Tapestry Garden. The design of the two spires is very important because they express the unifying theme for the whole project: Transformation, change and hope. The aspiration of all beings in nature to live in balance.

When I returned home to Berkeley in the fall of 2015, I created a detailed design for the first spire. I wanted the design to express abstractly the theme of all beings living in balance through the diversity of life of the Black Hills region.

In my design process, I also examined the structure of the spire and found it was like a three story building. It is made out a steel structure with multiple granite panels placed on top. I decided to create the relief on the spire by sandblasting due to the sensitive nature of this structure.

Black Hills Spire

The design of the first spire explores the characteristic landscapes of the Black Hills region such as grasslands, mountains/hills, waterscape and air. The sandblasted design moves upward in a spiral movement, wrapping around the spire. Integrated throughout the reliefs are animal footprints and human handprints. The handprints were collected from over 150 people from children to elders during the previous summer's 3rd annual Gathering of People, Wind and Water Native Art Festival in the Main Street Square. The children's handprints were placed on the top section of the spire symbolizing the hope for the future of this world. Read more.

Local dancer and choreographer Sara Olivier approached Yuki not long after he had been selected as the artist for The Sculpture Project about creating a cross-artistic performance collaboration. This was a first for Yuki. He agreed, and now Echoing Passages, which includes original dance, film, poetry and music inspired by Passage of Wind and Water, is unfolding alongside Yuki's work over five years.

Sara, 30, works with me as a Collaborative Strategist for Arts Rapid City and she teaches at Academy of Dance Arts. She and her husband, Austin, have a son, Henry, 5. Sara often says Echoing Passages is "for and about the community." Read more her process in the Q&A below and find out how you can get involved. Find more information about the projec, the artists and see more photos here.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-q-and-a-sara.html#sthash.T7QNM7Tm.dpuf

Local dancer and choreographer Sara Olivier approached Yuki not long after he had been selected as the artist for The Sculpture Project about creating a cross-artistic performance collaboration. This was a first for Yuki. He agreed, and now Echoing Passages, which includes original dance, film, poetry and music inspired by Passage of Wind and Water, is unfolding alongside Yuki's work over five years.

Sara, 30, works with me as a Collaborative Strategist for Arts Rapid City and she teaches at Academy of Dance Arts. She and her husband, Austin, have a son, Henry, 5. Sara often says Echoing Passages is "for and about the community." Read more her process in the Q&A below and find out how you can get involved. Find more information about the projec, the artists and see more photos here.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-q-and-a-sara.html#sthash.T7QNM7Tm.dpuf

Q: Please describe how getting students into their communities affects learning?

A: Passage to Schools lessons use a current community project to connect students' classroom learning to their wider community. When teachers link community events and projects to what their students are learning in the classroom, students are motivated to think at high levels because the learning feels relevant.

Q: Do these lessons stretch or go a little deeper than traditional lessons? How are they different than traditional classroom lessons?

A: These lessons are innovative in several ways.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-gabrielle-q-and-a.html#sthash.mWx4WOx0.dpuf

Q: Please describe how getting students into their communities affects learning?

A: Passage to Schools lessons use a current community project to connect students' classroom learning to their wider community. When teachers link community events and projects to what their students are learning in the classroom, students are motivated to think at high levels because the learning feels relevant.

Q: Do these lessons stretch or go a little deeper than traditional lessons? How are they different than traditional classroom lessons?

A: These lessons are innovative in several ways.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-gabrielle-q-and-a.html#sthash.mWx4WOx0.dpuf

Q: Please describe how getting students into their communities affects learning?

A: Passage to Schools lessons use a current community project to connect students' classroom learning to their wider community. When teachers link community events and projects to what their students are learning in the classroom, students are motivated to think at high levels because the learning feels relevant.

Q: Do these lessons stretch or go a little deeper than traditional lessons? How are they different than traditional classroom lessons?

A: These lessons are innovative in several ways.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-gabrielle-q-and-a.html#sthash.mWx4WOx0.dpuf

Are you percolating an original art project that needs seed money to get off the ground? Apply for a Sculpture Project Arts Programming Grant.

The grants, up to $5,000, are for art projects of all kinds that connect to The Sculpture Project. Projects need a downtown Rapid City connection, special consideration is given to proposals that include partners and collaborators, and a funding match is required. The final 2014 deadline is June 1.

The application is simple (really!) and can be found here. If you have questions about whether your project fits the criteria or about how to complete the application, please don't hesitate to contact anna@destinationrapidcity.com.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-grants.html#sthash.iCHw0Jt5.dpuf

Are you percolating an original art project that needs seed money to get off the ground? Apply for a Sculpture Project Arts Programming Grant.

The grants, up to $5,000, are for art projects of all kinds that connect to The Sculpture Project. Projects need a downtown Rapid City connection, special consideration is given to proposals that include partners and collaborators, and a funding match is required. The final 2014 deadline is June 1.

The application is simple (really!) and can be found here. If you have questions about whether your project fits the criteria or about how to complete the application, please don't hesitate to contact anna@destinationrapidcity.com.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-grants.html#sthash.iCHw0Jt5.dpuf

Are you percolating an original art project that needs seed money to get off the ground? Apply for a Sculpture Project Arts Programming Grant.

The grants, up to $5,000, are for art projects of all kinds that connect to The Sculpture Project. Projects need a downtown Rapid City connection, special consideration is given to proposals that include partners and collaborators, and a funding match is required. The final 2014 deadline is June 1.

The application is simple (really!) and can be found here. If you have questions about whether your project fits the criteria or about how to complete the application, please don't hesitate to contact anna@destinationrapidcity.com.

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-grants.html#sthash.iCHw0Jt5.dpuf

Christine Stewart shared a first draft of Part One of Passage of Wind and Water: A Choral Poem.

Christine writes that this draft is, "Inspired by the work of Mrs. Garrett's sixth-graders (Southwest Middle School) as well as several of the adult participants who have sent me lines, poems, and bits of prose. I have drafted the "wind" section of the choral poem. Several parts seem to be shaping up: stars, water, wind, stone, prairie. I'm eager to collect more submissions, so please send yours as soon as possible."

A choral poem is a poem designed to be read aloud by two or more people in a group setting. This first draft is crafted for three readers. To read the poem,

- See more at: http://www.rcsculptureproject.com/blog/on-the-blog-poem-draft.html#sthash.NYN9dc4F.dpuf

NEWS

Sculptor finishes year three, KEVN, October 11, 2015

Great progress on sculptures, KOTA, October 11, 2015

Five more stones revealed, Rapid City Journal, October 6, 2015

Barriers come down around Main Street Square Sculpture, KOTA, October 5, 2015

Sculpture Project marks another milestone, KEVN, October 5, 2015

Nagase turning chunks of rock into beauty, KOTA, July 17, 2015

Sculpture inspires Native arts gathering, Rapid City Journal, July 16, 2015

Engaging with public art, Rapid City Journal, July 9, 2015

Sculptor returns to Rapid City, KEVN, July 2, 2015

Community's living room taking shape, Rapid City Journal, June 18, 2015

Mural complements Sculpture Project, SDPB, June 15, 2015

Young artist's work inspired by Sculpture Project, KOTA, April 27, 2015

Behind the scenes with Aaron Pearcy, KOTA, April 27, 2015

Good, Bad and the Ugly: Mural project, Rapid City Journal, April 7, 2015

Mural inspired by Sculpture Project underway, Rapid City Journal, March 31, 2015

Read more news headlines here

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